Brand & Capture

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Psst Over Here! Tips for Attention-Grabbing Calls to Action

Shannon Barnes
Posted by Shannon Barnes

As marketers, we often spend a lot of time and money developing strategies to drive traffic to our website. If only our job ended there… life would be so simple. But as you know, our job only gets more complicated. Once a visitor lands on your site, you literally have seconds to prove your site is worth exploring. One way to quickly grab attention and take your visitors down a desired path is through well-crafted calls to action (CTAs).

5 Common Call to Action Mishaps—What Not to Do

Shannon Barnes
Posted by Shannon Barnes

Good marketers know driving quality traffic to websites is no easy task. They also know their job doesn’t stop here—they must engage and, most importantly, convert website visitors. Well-crafted and strategically placed calls to action (CTAs) are one way to effectively guide visitors to take a specific action. However, not all CTAs are created equal.

How to Un-awkwardly Incorporate CTAs Into Blog Posts

Lisa Gulasy
Posted by Lisa Gulasy

In content marketing, specifically blogging, it’s no secret calls to action (CTAs) are critical components for effective lead generation. Using a database of more than 50,000 blog posts, social media scientist Dan Zarella discovered posts including the words “comment,” “link” and/or "share" received more comments, views and links than posts that did not.

Tips to Help Calls to Action Get the Love They Deserve

Shannon Barnes
Posted by Shannon Barnes

Driving quality traffic to your site is a challenge in itself, so it is important to have strong calls to action (CTA) on every page of your site once you get visitors there. CTAs have two purposes: grab attention and encourage an action. In previous posts I shared best practices for CTA design and tips for creating effective copy; here we will focus on the final piece of the puzzle—CTA placement.

4 Tips for Designing Calls to Action that Get Noticed

Shannon Barnes
Posted by Shannon Barnes

The goal of a call to action (CTA) is to capture the attention of your visitors and convince them to take a particular action. When developing a CTA, there are three important factors to consider: copy, design and placement. Start by developing great CTA copy. (Check out my last blog for my top tips for creating effective call-to-action copy!) Here, we will discuss successful design, and stay tuned for a future post on placement best practices.

Smarter Inbound Marketing with Smart CTAs

Meghan Sullivan
Posted by Meghan Sullivan

Since August, The Brand & Capture bloggers have written many posts about the new HubSpot 3 tools. Highlights include updates to the contacts database, a new email tool and marketing automation workflows, all designed to take digital marketing to a more personalized level. Another feature that, personally, I’ve been really excited to use on my client accounts is the new CTA (call-to-action) builder.

Top Tips for Creating Effective Call-to-Action Copy

Shannon Barnes
Posted by Shannon Barnes

Within seconds of seeing your call to action (CTA), a visitor should be able to determine exactly why he or she should take action and what they will get in return for their information or money. The most effective CTA's contain action verbs, which we know describe an action or activity. Excluding these powerful words from your copy leaves the reader with little to no direction and often hurts your click rate ultimately affecting your conversion rate.

Going Beyond FREE—CTAs That Sell

John McTigue
Posted by John McTigue

At the core of inbound marketing is attracting your visitors to click on your compelling calls to action. I don't know the actual statistics, but it seems like the vast majority of CTAs are about getting something for FREE, usually a download or a free trial. Nobody would argue that free is bad, but if everybody offers something for free, how do we decide which button to click? Here are several examples of great CTAs that go beyond free and actually sell the goods.